Thursday, 1 March 2012

Being a Medievalist

I've posted this before, but by God it resonates.

From A. S. Byatt, The Game, p. 18.

'Like most mediaevalists she had chosen her subject out of an essentially Romantic preoccupation with the satisfactory remote violence of both the religious and the secular literature of the Middle Ages. She had come to Oxford hungry for the absolutely worked drama of Lancelot and Guenevere, Tristan and Iseult; she had slowly transmuted this into a passion for the symbolic possibilities of the Grail Legend. She combined the mediaevalist's love of the strange with the mediaevalist's passion for precision. The complexities of existence were the interrelations of roots and roses, strange beasts and fruits, in a walled garden, outside which a sea rose in formally dangerous peaks. She had elaborated, and believed, a network of symbols which made the outer world into a dazzling but comprehensible constellation of physical facts whose spiritual interrelations could be grasped and woven by the untiring intellect; suns, moons, stars, roses, cups, lances, lions and serpents, all had their place and also their meaning. This network was overlaid by another network interweaving other roots, footnotes, cross-references, bibliographical data, paleographical quirks. [Emphasis mine]. Somewhere, under the network, the truth shone; Cassandra had come, like many others looking for final Authority, logically to see it in the Church. This was a symbol, and also real; it was a guarantee. A passion for symbols is in some cases an automatic precursor of a passion for theology. Cassandra had embraced both.

But now and then, in certain moods, Cassandra remembered the root of this passion in the wash of romantic feeling with which she had first seen Oxford, having read indiscriminately in Walter Scott, Tennyson, Morris and Malory, looking for a life as brightly-coloured as books. She had not then had an interest in the conventions of the courtly love of the Roman de la Rose; she had cared about the feelings of Lancelot and Guenevere, disturbed in their blood-stained sheets. She had come, not from Ritual to Romance, but in the other direction, from romance to ritual. Her feeling for completeness had betrayed her to a way of live she had not quite chosen; the academic life had become almost accidentally a branch of the contemplative life. She had cultivated her walled-garden skills at the expense of any others she might have had. We become what we are, she told herself, by a series of involuntary half-choices; if this was not what she had meant, she did not know what else she could have done.'

7 comments:

Tlachtga said...

As a rank amateur, all I can say is "Yes".

Bo said...

So true, isn't it?

Cerdo said...

Thank you for sharing such a wonderful quote. Although I cannot claim to being a Medievalist, I certainly am fascinated, nay, impassioned by that era, which I count alongside the Renaissance as being inspirational and an important illumination to my very being. My numerous books on the subject are testament alone, be they on art, architecture, lives, philosophy, or writings such as Froissart or Julian of Norwich, Chaucer or Malory amongst others.

In short, definitely, no question, I identify :).

Bo said...

I knew you would!

Bo said...

I knew you would!

Perpetua said...

Now that makes me want to read the book. Though not a mediaevalist proper, I did study mediaeval German literature many years ago and am passionate about illuminated manuscripts and mediaeval art and architecture. Off now to check the library catalogue for this.

Bo said...

It's a good read!

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